Hostile Fire Pay and Imminent Danger Pay All Look the Same On Your LES

Cobb-ed—So get this—TBI therapy at Building 22 was only reserved for OIF and OEF veterans until recently when they opened up the services to those who served in “other” wars. What the ever living *explicit board doctor declared the war on terrorism more significant than other wars including Vietnam? I’m grateful but am growing resentment towards two-tiered VA treatment of all my comrades who are stuck with untreated conditions. The VA is broken and needs a State Voucher Program to fix it.

Luckily OP422 will solve the current problem. Hemp farming and processing will bring enough revenue to kick the federal VA in the fourth point of contact. Post 9/11 labelling is a Congressional wedge between veterans. If you served in combat, bore the flag on your right shoulder, you deserve resepect. If you served in combat with the 10th Mountain Division, you get double portions on Veterans Day at Golden Corral on me.

Cobb-ed—The Current American Veteran Quantum Physics Parabola VA Claims System

by Bob Cobb

Here is the current American Veteran Quantum Physics Parabola VA Claims System:

The Current Dilemma: Board Doctor denies you after you spent fourteen deployments at war defeating Terrorism. He never spent one day out of twenty years outside of garrison. He makes decisions based on Dow Opiate special interest lobbying and money he is receiving from back door corporations who funded the Napalm testing on Vietnam Vets. The veteran requests a CBD alternative. The doctor replies, “The VA does not condone any of that Goddamn Hippie Cannabis for you, are you crazy!?”

The reality of the 22: You return home with a General discharge because you got drunk one night and ended up starting a bar fight on base—the result of the over exacerbation of war.

You are no longer eligible for VA PTSD treatment. John Locke argues on behalf of the warrior who clearly identifies Constitutionally that any condition as a result of war is the responsibility of the people.

So then why is it the decision of the people through Congress to deny any veteran mental health treatment? Cannabis sharecropping through vouchers is the solution.

Cobb-ed—The Current American Veteran Quantum Physics Parabola VA Claims System

by Bob Cobb

Here is the current American Veteran Quantum Physics Parabola VA Claims System:

The Current Dilemma: Board Doctor denies you after you spent fourteen deployments at war defeating Terrorism. He never spent one day out of twenty years outside of garrison. He makes decisions based on Dow Opiate special interest lobbying and money he is receiving from back door corporations who funded the Napalm testing on Vietnam Vets. The veteran requests a CBD alternative. The doctor replies, “The VA does not condone any of that Goddamn Hippie Cannabis for you, are you crazy!?”

The reality of the 22: You return home with a General discharge because you got drunk one night and ended up starting a bar fight on base—the result of the over exacerbation of war.

You are no longer eligible for VA PTSD treatment. John Locke argues on behalf of the warrior who clearly identifies Constitutionally that any condition as a result of war is the responsibility of the people.

So then why is it the decision of the people through Congress to deny any veteran mental health treatment? Cannabis sharecropping through vouchers is the solution.

Reflections of Our Brave Vietnam Veterans at Truax Campus and Veterans Resource Fair

Reflections of Our Brave Vietnam Veterans at Truax Campus and Veterans Resource Fair

by Bradley J. Burt 4:22 Chronicles Editor-in-Chief

15 March 2019—Friday March 29th, 2019, the Truax Campus will be hosting its annual veteran resource fair in the cafeteria through the Veterans Resources Coordinator Allan Locia, who stated: “Our development of our on-campus resource fair will be more of a robust offering this year,” who is inviting our campus to spend time in remembrance of the Vietnam War, which is the highlight of the event.

The significance of the “Reflections of Vietnam” exhibit is a showcase of equipment through a journey of the storytelling of those who were there to see it.  This group started in the ‘80s through the Vietnam Veterans of America, as a retrospect come to life, through the reality of the Vietnam war, as witnessed through the eyes of the members of the group. 

The mobile museum’s intent is to bring the reality of Vietnam to life by viewing the equipment on display as a token of artifactual evidence of the conflict during that period of time being ushered by those who are a part of the exhibit.  Items will be displayed in lockers and guest Vietnam Veterans will be on site to tell the stories of the items on display.  The mobile museum is one of the largest displays in the state of Wisconsin and will surely be one not to miss. 

“Vietnam Veterans will be sharing their experience from the conflict, not so much from their transition, but more of what the war was like,” stated Locia. 

            The entire dedication Allan has put into the event stems from his commitment to seeing to it our Wolfpack veterans are being provided with an academic support system by guiding our veteran student body with professional development.  Allan’s mission along with the VRS Mission statement seeks to “promote veterans’ resources at school and connect students to help them navigate the college system, while assisting them with transition to civilian life.”

The Veterans Resource Fair through the coordinating of Allan Locia will be offered by the members of the Veterans Lounge at the Truax Cafeteria, where VA and community partners will be on-site to assist its veterans to bring employers who will help them find jobs, as well as educating student veterans of their available resources with their college to civilian, and veteran to college transition as there are a significant amount returning to school later in life through the VA VITAL program.  The resource fair will aid the entire spectrum of veterans who are seeking outside sources, who will help aid their boots on the ground academic journey.

May we always pause each day to reflect on our American liberties to pay respect to the POW*MIA who will not be forgotten.

If you are interested in hosting the Reflections of Vietnam through the Vietnam Veterans of America, there point of contact information is as follows:

John Koehler 

kent1952@live.com

920 858 3310 

Vietnam Veterans of America – Chapter 351

Reflections of Our Brave Vietnam Veterans at Truax Campus and Veterans Resource Fair

Reflections of Our Brave Vietnam Veterans at Truax Campus and Veterans Resource Fair

by Bradley J. Burt 4:22 Chronicles Editor-in-Chief

15 March 2019—Friday March 29th, 2019, the Truax Campus will be hosting its annual veteran resource fair in the cafeteria through the Veterans Resources Coordinator Allan Locia, who stated: “Our development of our on-campus resource fair will be more of a robust offering this year,” who is inviting our campus to spend time in remembrance of the Vietnam War, which is the highlight of the event.

The significance of the “Reflections of Vietnam” exhibit is a showcase of equipment through a journey of the storytelling of those who were there to see it.  This group started in the ‘80s through the Vietnam Veterans of America, as a retrospect come to life, through the reality of the Vietnam war, as witnessed through the eyes of the members of the group. 

The mobile museum’s intent is to bring the reality of Vietnam to life by viewing the equipment on display as a token of artifactual evidence of the conflict during that period of time being ushered by those who are a part of the exhibit.  Items will be displayed in lockers and guest Vietnam Veterans will be on site to tell the stories of the items on display.  The mobile museum is one of the largest displays in the state of Wisconsin and will surely be one not to miss. 

“Vietnam Veterans will be sharing their experience from the conflict, not so much from their transition, but more of what the war was like,” stated Locia. 

            The entire dedication Allan has put into the event stems from his commitment to seeing to it our Wolfpack veterans are being provided with an academic support system by guiding our veteran student body with professional development.  Allan’s mission along with the VRS Mission statement seeks to “promote veterans’ resources at school and connect students to help them navigate the college system, while assisting them with transition to civilian life.”

The Veterans Resource Fair through the coordinating of Allan Locia will be offered by the members of the Veterans Lounge at the Truax Cafeteria, where VA and community partners will be on-site to assist its veterans to bring employers who will help them find jobs, as well as educating student veterans of their available resources with their college to civilian, and veteran to college transition as there are a significant amount returning to school later in life through the VA VITAL program.  The resource fair will aid the entire spectrum of veterans who are seeking outside sources, who will help aid their boots on the ground academic journey.

May we always pause each day to reflect on our American liberties to pay respect to the POW*MIA who will not be forgotten.

If you are interested in hosting the Reflections of Vietnam through the Vietnam Veterans of America, there point of contact information is as follows:

John Koehler 

kent1952@live.com

920 858 3310 

Vietnam Veterans of America – Chapter 351

Honoring Uncle Lee Burt and the Story of Growing Up With a Gold Star Grandmother

In Memory of Lee Burt-World War 2

Growing up on Appleton Street in Appleton, WI in the ’80s in the Burt family was about being strong in the Lord and finding your guiding light at Mount Olive Lutheran Church–My Grandmother Erna Burt’s Church. Our family listened to grandma when she would mourn her son over Sunday chicken dinner. We would join her in prayer when she would insist we say the entire second half of our traditional dinner prayer, “Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good. His love endures forever.” I imagine the level of grief she felt when she muttered those words after losing her son from the trials and tribulations of war. My grandmother raised many sons, but Lee will always be one who was near and dear to her heart.

My grandmother was one of the mothers who was afflicted by our Department of the Army who was notified her son would not return home. Our visitations growing up were about respect and honor as Burts. My grandmother wore the burden of losing a son to war all the days of her life after her son did not return home. Our family understands the value and cost of war.

My father, Davis Burt, was a “Bay of Pigs” missile crewmember. I recall the days of being a hyperactive little brat in front of his mother being punished by making me read his Atlas binary missile code manuals that instinctively planted the seed the military was a challenge as my dad toughened me up growing up.

Having a Gold Star grandmother meant a lot to me when she was alive. I knew one day Erna would be reunited with her son, but her time spent praying in the garden was her way of coping through hardships that kept the family fed. Grandma worked as a volunteer at Mount Olive with Ladies Aid. I would always ask her, “is it Ladies Aid because you need hearing aides?” Her grimace was always her rebuttal.

I grew up with a heritage of honor and responsibility as an example set by Grandma Burt. As I sit here typing, I recall her singing to me and telling me stories about her son Lee. Grandma’s stories always spoke of her son as a brave young man who sacrificed his life to set our democracy free. I often pondered how difficult growing up in the depression was after hearing Grandma share her stories with me.

Being raised by a Gold Star Grandmother taught me virtue and value to appreciate those who serve in the military, who never make it home. I never met my Grandfather or Uncle Lee. The only thing I knew was we sacrificed a member of our family’s life as told in scripture and that is to be considered a divine blessing, not an overgrown path of misery. My grandma lost a son to war. Her example of dedication to faith is the reason I confide so strongly in the Lord in my darkest hour. Growing up hearing legendary stories of Uncle Lee eventually led me to join the military. Uncle Lee carried me in basic training recalling his picture I found at Grandma’s house in a shoe box. Grandma passed away while I was in basic training. I never got to say goodbye. I did come to understand she was proud of me for joining and following Uncle Lee.

Having a Gold Star Grandmother and her lessons gave me the extra courage to finish my duty regardless of those left behind. God bless our Gold Star Mothers and may we always seek to lighten their burden.

Remembering Hellraiser 3rd Platoon Delta 1/19FA Battle Brother Bryan Freeman

Bryan Freeman aka Robocop

Hellraisers Shoot Kill…Ready to Die but Never Will

            Memorial Day of 2006, I was home from Madison, WI where I was spending the construction year in Verona, WI trimming massive slates of stone for the Epic Center working for Findorff.  Newly divorced, wild, and free was how I rolled back then.  I had decided to stop in the local taverino downtown Appleton, WI, at Emmet’s Bar and Grill who had tall frosty mugs cheap.  The news flashed Freeman’s face.  ABC announced he had fallen in Iraq and was instantly stunned into grief.  We Hellraisers have a motto: “Hellraisers Shoot to Kill–Ready to Die, But Never Will…”  We Hellraisers bleed.  We never die. The toughest member of our unit was now gone and was my soul filled with despair.  

            Being a member of the Hellraisers 1st Battalion 19th Field Artillery Regiment with Delta Battery Third Platoon during Somalia was ruthless.  We had a Basic Training Battery that consisted of 10th Mountain Division Light Infantry Divarty COHORT who were assembled as a deployed readiness force that consisted of back-alley hustlers all the way to crackheads from New York City, NY, all chomping at the bit to go kick some ass and give payback for dragging our 10th Mountain in the street.  Bryan Freeman was one.  You did not want to get caught in his crosshairs.  He was our toughest and bravest.  He had absolute ground zero ruggedness and was not afraid of anyone.

            08 February 1994 was my reporting orders to Fort Sill, OK.  I was ready to do whatever it took to tuck-and-roll off a UH 60 Delta Blackhawk if it meant getting the mission done.  I met a squared away hard-charger they called “Robocop,” who was the toughest to crack being built like a brick-shithouse ready to fight.

            Bryan Freeman and I instantly became friends one night on fire watch doing donkey kicks and mimicking Drill Sergeant Hunt and his “no’havin-none-of-that-bullshit-here” lectures.

            We were not afraid of any extra physical training, kitchen duty, or grass drills.  We had to eat as much as we could whenever we could.  That was until “the Dying Cockroach” happened.

            Fast-forward to 2006, after watching the Memorial Day revelation on the sports bar T.V. availed to me later my battle brother was killed in Iraq from a roadside bomb.  I had no idea what to do.  I was in shock as his grandfather was one of the first African American Rangers and knew he was combat certified.

            Losing a family member is like a spear stabbing you in the side with dread.  Losing someone you served in Basic Training felt like there was a piece of your lineage ripped off like a band-aid.

            I dedicate my life to respectfully honoring all who ended up like Robocop did.  I’m taking my sweet time nowadays with getting around being 10th Mountain tested and survived.  I think we need to continue passing along the torch each year to commemorate all who have sacrificed their lives to make today belong to the people of America.  Please honor our wounded and care for the Gold Star Families and our veteran Auxiliaries.  God Bless the families of the fallen on this Memorial Day, especially the Freeman family

Remembering Hellraiser 3rd Platoon Delta 1/19FA Battle Brother Bryan Freeman

Bryan Freeman aka Robocop

Hellraisers Shoot Kill…Ready to Die but Never Will

            Memorial Day of 2006, I was home from Madison, WI where I was spending the construction year in Verona, WI trimming massive slates of stone for the Epic Center working for Findorff.  Newly divorced, wild, and free was how I rolled back then.  I had decided to stop in the local taverino downtown Appleton, WI, at Emmet’s Bar and Grill who had tall frosty mugs cheap.  The news flashed Freeman’s face.  ABC announced he had fallen in Iraq and was instantly stunned into grief.  We Hellraisers have a motto: “Hellraisers Shoot to Kill–Ready to Die, But Never Will…”  We Hellraisers bleed.  We never die. The toughest member of our unit was now gone and was my soul filled with despair.  

            Being a member of the Hellraisers 1st Battalion 19th Field Artillery Regiment with Delta Battery Third Platoon during Somalia was ruthless.  We had a Basic Training Battery that consisted of 10th Mountain Division Light Infantry Divarty COHORT who were assembled as a deployed readiness force that consisted of back-alley hustlers all the way to crackheads from New York City, NY, all chomping at the bit to go kick some ass and give payback for dragging our 10th Mountain in the street.  Bryan Freeman was one.  You did not want to get caught in his crosshairs.  He was our toughest and bravest.  He had absolute ground zero ruggedness and was not afraid of anyone.

            08 February 1994 was my reporting orders to Fort Sill, OK.  I was ready to do whatever it took to tuck-and-roll off a UH 60 Delta Blackhawk if it meant getting the mission done.  I met a squared away hard-charger they called “Robocop,” who was the toughest to crack being built like a brick-shithouse ready to fight.

            Bryan Freeman and I instantly became friends one night on fire watch doing donkey kicks and mimicking Drill Sergeant Hunt and his “no’havin-none-of-that-bullshit-here” lectures.

            We were not afraid of any extra physical training, kitchen duty, or grass drills.  We had to eat as much as we could whenever we could.  That was until “the Dying Cockroach” happened.

            Fast-forward to 2006, after watching the Memorial Day revelation on the sports bar T.V. availed to me later my battle brother was killed in Iraq from a roadside bomb.  I had no idea what to do.  I was in shock as his grandfather was one of the first African American Rangers and knew he was combat certified.

            Losing a family member is like a spear stabbing you in the side with dread.  Losing someone you served in Basic Training felt like there was a piece of your lineage ripped off like a band-aid.

            I dedicate my life to respectfully honoring all who ended up like Robocop did.  I’m taking my sweet time nowadays with getting around being 10th Mountain tested and survived.  I think we need to continue passing along the torch each year to commemorate all who have sacrificed their lives to make today belong to the people of America.  Please honor our wounded and care for the Gold Star Families and our veteran Auxiliaries.  God Bless the families of the fallen on this Memorial Day, especially the Freeman family

Why do I Thank Veterans?

Why do I Thank Veterans?

            Every morning at 0630, a service member stands tall by rendering a salute to Reveille.  What this means is that this individual understands the importance of recognizing the level of intensity they are about to face as a member of an elite force this day by honoring our nation’s colors.  How this translates in relationship to my freedom is an on-going swearing of an oath taken at the processing center pledging to our nation to swear to protect our borders from our enemies foreign and domestic.

Climb to Glory

            We Americans are a unique breed.  We stand before our nation with democracy as our first responsibility to uphold and defend.  When I entered into basic training in 1994, I knew full well my responsibility to this nation.  We were at war with Somalia who was dragging our soldiers through their city streets who were my 10th Mountain Division brothers and sisters at Mogadishu.

            After serving as a Spec Ops Commander’s RTO and M60 gunner on QRF in Port Au Prince during “Operation Uphold Democracy,” I was able to witness the return to power of Bertrand Aristide through the help of President Jimmy Carter.  We survived a monsoon and developed a restore to order in a third world nation who has stuck with me for the rest of my life.

            I was also a Battalion Executive Officer’s Driver to a West Point Human Factors Engineering Professor who tried to get me to re-enlist but decided to take up masonry instead.  The Montgomery G.I. Bill gave me the financial backing to return to school and finish my apprenticeship.  Fast-forward twenty-two years later, things are not so great.  Although I have conquered the mountain and have climbed to glory at Truax to be a shining example of tenacity and bravery, I have had to overcome TBI and stigma from missing work to treat my condition.  I am living proof we 10th Mountain fear no obstacle, especially a combative Jane Fonda progressive professor that disrespects construction workers, who do not hold a candle to the UW arts and sciences liberal arts transfer program according to her.  We suck it up and move on.

            But none of that compares to what our brave men and women have done to keep me in school.  Long waits through appeals are the hardship veterans face.  Denial, after denial, after denial, until finally one day the Veterans Administration awards them their combat fatigue service-connected claim that developed into complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. 

            A congressman who ignores them when they leave Building 22 at the William S. Middleton Hospital that still has not returned his call for over 24 months consecutive.  I thank veterans because they are stuck dealing with neglect who are just trying to hold down a job who are harassed for using the VA.

            I thank veterans for their loss.  To truly know what it feels like to bear the burden of survivor’s guilt is the crux a person like me has to bear to wear the United States colors on their right shoulder to fulfill their oath and would do it all over again.

            I mostly thank our veterans because of the funeral bugle call of Taps. I have been to Arlington National Cemetery on Memorial Day and am feeling goosebumps as I write.  I try to recall the 22 in meditation, along with individuals like Matt Maupin who was captured in Iraq and tortured to death for our freedom.  Thanking a veteran is the least I can do as a Service Officer for the American Legion who understands one thing. 

            We thank veterans for the crux they must carry.  We thank veterans for the burden they face when they return home. But most of all, we thank veterans because we genuinely care that they live one more day and do not end up a statistic that almost happened to me. Thank you for Building 22, Kristin Bull Lyon for developing VA VITAL at Truax, and our auxillaries for all that you do.  We are the benefactors from the hard work and dedication to keep our veterans transitioning who return home.

Nightbringers Review 2019

“Nightbringers(2018)” by The Black Dahlia Murder 

        As one might gather, another Black Dahlia Murder album was introduced to the masses known as “Nightbringers(2018).”  The abysmal riffage that takes the listener through a detailed maze of gothic chugs and orchestral remonstrances awakens the mind through the selection of professional dark artistic engineering of the Black Dahlia Murder finished product, which can be heard throughout Nightbringers, that is the epitome of what a death metal production should sound like.  

       This masterpiece of macabre and malevolence starts out as a quick picking arrangement with colorful speed harmonies.  The Black Dahlia Murder fills my ears with symphonies of grounding when I am in a state of Post-traumatic crippling panic.  I reach out to Spotify in these times after excusing myself from the situation to find solitude through PTSD Coach App that walks me through my headphones listening to Nightbringers.

       Spotify is a free service for college students that combines with Hulu for a small five dollar fee.  I tune into the Black Dahlia Murder at school to help me stay focused on the mission to keep my stress condition under control.  Stress triggers manifest like a whispering succubus at first, like heard with the monstrous double bass heard throughout this epic saga of brutal percussive blasts, conjuring of guitar wizardry, through sacrifugal rolling solos of inundated effigy and mastery of double bass ass kicking pyre.   I have developed a breathing mechanism in times of panic into with the beat thanks to Spotify and Nightbringers through PTSD Coach App grounding strategies.  Pulling yourself in during a crippling panic attack is met by a cathartic recalling of the event that leads me into knowing I can walk through the moment hearing the double bass mechanics develop my breathing.

      The Black Dahlia Murder is my form of warrior catharsis that keeps me grounded at the moment.  When the moment becomes overwhelmingly difficult, I call for A10 Warthog 10th Mountain Lightfighter support during my times of fight or flight, which I find therapeutic through the developing mechanisms the Black Dahlia Murder delivers me through this song when I am too overwhelmed with emotion.  Death metal takes me out of the moment and reels me into a dystopian art that can be successfully navigated with the savage beastly conquering tunes of the Black Dahlia Murder for PTSD moments.  Hypervigilance happens quick.  You can count on Nightbringers to bring you back to thoughts of clarity and safety.  Download the PTSD Coach App and reach out to the operators at the Veteran Crisis Line.  They helped me and will help you as well.