Bob Cobb Freelance Ink. LLC Journey to Develop OP 422—the Freelance Journalism Reporting for Scorn Valor Veteran Stories of the United States of America

Outpost 422 is a group of Capitol veterans watching over the community who report to Bob Cobb on Facebook.

So the journey begins to becoming an LLC. I have decided to follow in the footsteps of Hunter S. Thompson and become a freelance writer to pay back past debts and support me and my kid as I attempt to finish school. Those who know me have read my business plan and know exactly what I do with my advocacy writing at the 4:22 Chronicles. As of now, I am the founder of the Sacred Warrior Church of Native America Inc. and am coming up on the one year anniversary with my report to the state of Wisconsin.
My church collects destroyed Hemp to give back to reservations. Hemp is not Capital. Hemp is a sacred indigenous rite of spirituality and healing and am a Hemp Processor for this specific reason. The veterans who intern through this agency are all united under one identity—Bob Cobb. Bob Cobb Freelance Ink. LLC is their Homeland Security Reporter. We are the watchdogs in the community who are united through one mission through the 422nd Rescue and Recovery Brigade who are utilizing a QRF outpost at Peace Park on State Street.
Outpost 422 is my combat correspondence and consumer protection operation for Homeland Security to kick the rogues out of our state who steal Hemp or strong-arm farmers into allowing them to process their product.
The Wisconsin Hemp Pilot Program is unregulated and needs tougher enforcement on punks who are wrecking it for everyone. I will be starting up a talk show to discuss looting and predatory dispensaries I have uncovered during my Operation: Greenspace mission. I am a reporter. I am seeking justice to be served on all who are involved and am relentlessly working day and night with DATCP to put a stop to it.

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The American Legion Emblem and What This Means to Me

See the source image
The American Legion emblem consists of the rays of the sun, the wreath, the star, outer rings, inner rings, and the words.

The American Legion Emblem

According to the “2019 Officer’s Guide and Manual of Ceremonies,” the American Legion emblem “is laid upon the rays of the sun, giver of life, warmth and courage; foe of the cold, of the darkness, of fear, of apprehension.” As a Service Officer, staff member, and a disabled veteran who is dedicated to carrying out the mission of the four pillars of the American Legion, I realize there is the foundation, the American Legion emblem, which is the symbol of our heritage. Our image found in the Legion emblem shines like a beacon that radiates our efforts as peacekeepers and goodwill stewards in our community. Page 3 of the Officer’s Guide states, “every part of the American Legion emblem has meaning.”

The best way for me to describe what the American Legion emblem means to me can be summarized through my devotion to serve as a Service Officer. The American Legion emblem is my passion to share information that may be helpful found in our manuals. Without our manuals, we would not be clear about our mission, and without our mission, we are lost as veterans.

The great part about being a Service Officer is sharing VA information found on VA.gov. Sharing information with our members allows me to act as a steward to relay information found in our manuals, ask questions for those who may be unsure of an answer, and to seek procedures approved by our executive committee so all can understand. The American Legion heritage developed by our elders has laid down the road to freedom we enjoy when we attend our fundraisers and conventions. Our efforts to carry the torch found in our emblem as Legionnaires seeks to continue the American Legion mission. Our firing squads honor all those who enter Post Everlasting. As a Service Officer, I dedicate my spare time studying and memorizing our manuals as a means to pledge to act through virtues our elders created that are expected of officers to carry out and execute.

As officers, we seek proper policies when approaching situations where the American Legion emblem and its reputation may be at stake. Knowing why we serve the Legion and where to find the information makes our organization run professionally. Honor, duty, and dedication to serve the American Legion is a privilege, when we seek to run our posts through our collective efforts of solvency, by disciplining ourselves as members, who recognize our first duty is to preserve the image of our American Legion servanthood.

Emblem

“There shines the Emblem of The American Legion, it is your badge of distinction, honor and service. It stands for God and Country, and the highest rights of man. Of its several parts, each has a meaning.”

Elements of the emblem

The rays of the sun

Rays Of the Sun

The rays of the sun form the background of our proud emblem and suggests the Legion’s principles will dispel the darkness of violence and evil.

The wreath

The Wreath

The wreath forms the center, in loving memory of those brave comrades who gave their lives in the service of the United States that liberty might endure.

The star

The Star

The star, victory symbol of World War I, also symbolizes honor, glory and constancy. The letters “U.S.” leave no doubt as to the brightest star in the Legion’s star.

Outer rings

The Two Large Rings

The larger of two outer rings stands for the rehabilitation of our sick and disabled comrades. The smaller inside ring denotes the welfare of America’s children.

Inner rings

Two Small Rings

The smaller of two inner rings set upon the star represents service to our communities, states and the nation. The larger outer ring pledges loyalty to Americanism.

American Legion

The Words American Legion

The words American Legion tie the whole together for truth, remembrance, constancy, honor, service, veterans affairs and rehabilitation, children and youth, loyalty, and Americanism.

About

The American Legion
The American Legion

The American Legion was chartered and incorporated by Congress in 1919 as a patriotic veterans organization devoted to mutual helpfulness.

Disclaimer: We are a donated service to the Wisconsin American Legion Press Association, who are board member moderators of this blog page. Our mission is to transmit American Legion information to our posts. We are training Legionnaires to write blogs and archives. The information listed was taken from: https://www.legion.org/idaho/emblem

The American Legion Emblem and What This Means to Me

See the source image
The American Legion emblem consists of the rays of the sun, the wreath, the star, outer rings, inner rings, and the words.

The American Legion Emblem

According to the “2019 Officer’s Guide and Manual of Ceremonies,” the American Legion emblem “is laid upon the rays of the sun, giver of life, warmth and courage; foe of the cold, of the darkness, of fear, of apprehension.” As a Service Officer, staff member, and a disabled veteran who is dedicated to carrying out the mission of the four pillars of the American Legion, I realize there is the foundation, the American Legion emblem, which is the symbol of our heritage. Our image found in the Legion emblem shines like a beacon that radiates our efforts as peacekeepers and goodwill stewards in our community. Page 3 of the Officer’s Guide states, “every part of the American Legion emblem has meaning.”

The best way for me to describe what the American Legion emblem means to me can be summarized through my devotion to serve as a Service Officer. The American Legion emblem is my passion to share information that may be helpful found in our manuals. Without our manuals, we would not be clear about our mission, and without our mission, we are lost as veterans.

The great part about being a Service Officer is sharing VA information found on VA.gov. Sharing information with our members allows me to act as a steward to relay information found in our manuals, ask questions for those who may be unsure of an answer, and to seek procedures approved by our executive committee so all can understand. The American Legion heritage developed by our elders has laid down the road to freedom we enjoy when we attend our fundraisers and conventions. Our efforts to carry the torch found in our emblem as Legionnaires seeks to continue the American Legion mission. Our firing squads honor all those who enter Post Everlasting. As a Service Officer, I dedicate my spare time studying and memorizing our manuals as a means to pledge to act through virtues our elders created that are expected of officers to carry out and execute.

As officers, we seek proper policies when approaching situations where the American Legion emblem and its reputation may be at stake. Knowing why we serve the Legion and where to find the information makes our organization run professionally. Honor, duty, and dedication to serve the American Legion is a privilege, when we seek to run our posts through our collective efforts of solvency, by disciplining ourselves as members, who recognize our first duty is to preserve the image of our American Legion servanthood.

Emblem

“There shines the Emblem of The American Legion, it is your badge of distinction, honor and service. It stands for God and Country, and the highest rights of man. Of its several parts, each has a meaning.”

Elements of the emblem

The rays of the sun

Rays Of the Sun

The rays of the sun form the background of our proud emblem and suggests the Legion’s principles will dispel the darkness of violence and evil.

The wreath

The Wreath

The wreath forms the center, in loving memory of those brave comrades who gave their lives in the service of the United States that liberty might endure.

The star

The Star

The star, victory symbol of World War I, also symbolizes honor, glory and constancy. The letters “U.S.” leave no doubt as to the brightest star in the Legion’s star.

Outer rings

The Two Large Rings

The larger of two outer rings stands for the rehabilitation of our sick and disabled comrades. The smaller inside ring denotes the welfare of America’s children.

Inner rings

Two Small Rings

The smaller of two inner rings set upon the star represents service to our communities, states and the nation. The larger outer ring pledges loyalty to Americanism.

American Legion

The Words American Legion

The words American Legion tie the whole together for truth, remembrance, constancy, honor, service, veterans affairs and rehabilitation, children and youth, loyalty, and Americanism.

About

The American Legion
The American Legion

The American Legion was chartered and incorporated by Congress in 1919 as a patriotic veterans organization devoted to mutual helpfulness.

Disclaimer: We are a donated service to the Wisconsin American Legion Press Association, who are board member moderators of this blog page. Our mission is to transmit American Legion information to our posts. We are training Legionnaires to write blogs and archives. The information listed was taken from: https://www.legion.org/idaho/emblem

The 101st Annual Department Convention of the American Legion Department of Wisconsin—Day Three

Timothy La Sage–Marine Corps Scout Sniper Story. La Sage noted “the Shot” saved a Brigadier General’s life.

Timothy La Sage Marine Corps Scout Sniper:

At 0930 hours on July 20th, 2019, the third day of festivities began in the Michigan room of the Marriot West in Middleton, WI for the American Legion Department of Wisconsin 101st Convention. Timothy La Sage was introduced by Commander Frank Kotska and was instantly engaged with his audience. La Sage took a tactical approach to his introduction by hiding. We heard him speak, but did not know where he was, who was whispering, “sometimes a person in the battlefield is someone you are looking for…I could be 1,000 yards behind you, searching somewhere, for a high value target in your group. I could be watching for days, waiting to see who comes off the battlefield today.”

La Sage’s story was capivating capturing the intense lens of what life as a Scout Sniper is like who said, “there is never a break, never a day off. There is no pool in Baghdad.”

La Sage went onto describe what Marine Sniper living conditions were like by using the American Legion convention stage table as an example. During down time, La Sage stated he stayed in a space filled with eighteen snipers, with all of their gear, in bunk beds, all packed together.

Timothy La Sage, a Wisconsin native, works for WPS Solutions who is a Military Affairs Manager. He served with Seal Team Five with the FAST Company (Fleet Anti-terroism Security Teams.) La Sage’s famous shot was taken from 680 yards, standing, with a moving vehicle as his target, which prematurely detonated an IED. La Sage noted the terrorist lead vehicle had crashed into the explosion, allowing the approaching friendly convoy to escape. La Sage’s long-range shot saved the mission by taking out an invisible threat allowing for the oncoming Brigade Commander to make it through what he called the “kill zone.” After meeting with the Brigadier General, he asked La Sage if he wanted a coin who narrated his experience by saying, “all he wanted to do was give us a coin.”

La Sage also spoke of a situation where one of his comrades experienced a grazing fire bullet from a terrorist sniper close to 300 yards away. I know exactly what this feels like being on night guard in Port au Prince with 10th MP. We experienced grazing fire from combatants in Operation Uphold Democracy. As La Sage continued to share this individual’s story I began recalling how helpless I felt being ordered to “hold fire” due to rules of engagement. There is a psychological aspect to grazing fire you never forget. All it takes is for a recalling of an event to take you back. La Sage’s comrade is lucky to be alive. As an advocate for those who spent time in our nation’s outposts, I strongly urge all who suffer through this experience to reach out to PTSD Coach app and decide for yourself where you are at when dealing with the aftershock of war.

Thank you for your service Timothy La Sage and appreciate your dedication to sharing your unique perspective with America. We need more to share their documentary of their service to better understand why we seek to protect our borders with our military.

Sincerely,

Bradley J. Burt

American Legion Post 501 of Madison, WI

Service Officer/Wisconsin American Legion Press Association Board Member

The 101st American Legion Department of Wisconsin Convention Friday July, 19th Host Committee Report

Day Two: Opening Ceremony, Wisconsin American Legion Press Association Board Member Meeting and Board Member Appointment, and a Whole Lotta GNUTS

Opening Ceremony:

Today kicked off the Department of Wisconsin American Legion Convention ceremony with a beautiful performance of the National Anthem by Department Commander Frank Kotska’s granddaughter. Her performance was nothing short of pure solid gold. After the Pledge of Allegiance and American Legion Constitution were recited, Gurdio Brak, the Mayor of Middleton, gave a speech thanking the members of the American Legion for hosting his son with the Badger Boys State. His son is a Professor of Physics at UW Madison. Department Commander Frank Kotska presented him with a plaque.

Major General Dunbar-Director of Homeland Security and Wisconsin National Guard Commander’s Presentaion:

At 0926 hours, Major General Dunbar presented to Legionnaires a slideshow of the various facets of our Wisconsin National Guard who proudly proclaimed, “the 115th Fighter Wing is scheduled to receive F35 Fighter Jet; the second National Guard unit in the nation, which is the sixth to receive in the Air Force.”

According to Major General Dunbar, our National Guard of Wisconsin has well over 1,000 members deployed in the Middle East with women in the guard leading male-dominated communities to seek diversity. Women in uniform are leading middle east communities.

Lastly, Major General Dunbar went on to share the story of June 6th, the D-Day Invasion, who was invited to the 75th Anniversary in Normandy. His story was about overcoming obstacles. He went on to quote Bruce Springsteen who wrote, “My father said son, were lucky in this town…your flag flying over the courthouse means certain things are set in stone. What we are, what we will do and what we won’t.”

Major General Dunbar left the audience with a powerful ending about our presence in the community as veterans who said, “we defend it, and what we won’t do is ever let this country down.”

Check out this link to see more of the 115th Fighter Wing F35 action:

Commander Kotska Presents Mike Hert—DAV Commander

After witnessing a powerful display of emotion by our State of Wisconsin Adjutant, DAV Commander Mike Hert followed suit. As a Service Officer, I have been through the ringer with VA claims and instantly related to Hert’s story. His compelling truths became evident as to why we strive as Legionnaires to care for one another. Hert spoke of the earlier years where veteran organizations had rivalries between each other during the World War 1 and World War 2 era. He went on to state, “we didn’t always acknowledge one another.”

Hert’s emphasis was of humility who stated, ” I am a disabled veteran, please help me…this is a national disgrace! No more! No more!” Hert went on to share these words were spoken by Robert Marx post World War 1, founder of Disabled American Veterans. Marx claimed the DAV mission was service and advocacy.

Hert stated, “Empowering veterans by leading high quality lives with dignity and respect is how we as a veteran community survive.” Hert went onto quote Abraham Lincoln’s, “a house divided cannot stand” who believed veterans must stand for one another.

Hert’s closing statement lit my PTSD and veteran suicide advocacy by making clear in his statement, “when we stand together as veterans, we are an unstoppable force.”

Thank you Commander Dunbar and Commander Hert for your powerful words. As a member of both the American Legion and DAV I appreciate the influence you both brought to our convention.

Wisconsin American Legion Press Association Board Member Meeting and Board Member Appointment:

At 1300 hours, the Wisconsin American Legion Press Association met in Salon A to discuss the future of the Badger Legionnaire. We were informed the Badger Legionnaire would be going to six newspaper prints for the next year due to cost and demand. Department Communications would like the posts to become more engaged through blogs, websites, and Facebook pages to reach their members to keep cost down. I decided to become a board member to help lead our future Legionnaires learn how to write blogs through my WordPress website blogs called “Outpost 422.”

We are also looking to combine our efforts to converge throughout our districts on one Facebook page for posts to share blogs from. Outpost 422 will be writing blogs for the American Legion Communications Archive Exchange on Facebook and will gladly assist our members and officers with creating blogs. As a board member, I suggested we all meet on one page to share our notes as post level communications and archive. You can print out blogs for those who are unable to access digital mediums, which help out with waste by keeping what you like and leaving the rest.

We are also looking to the future to collaborate at the district level to encourage our districts to update their communications medium through websites.

The American Legion Communications Archive Exchange through Outpost 422 admin can be found here:

https://www.facebook.com/postcommunicationsleadershipguidearchive/?modal=admin_todo_tou

Employer Awards:

Thank you employers listed for your excellent dedication to hiring veterans in our community. These employers were recognized by the Wisconsin Departement of the American Legion for their exceptional gallantry above and beyond the call to assist the veteran community.

Being a Legionnaire take GNUTS—the GNUTS Social Meeting for Adjutants

Commander Tom pointed me to the GNUTS Committee meeting who told me “they get pretty rowdy” and warned me not to punch anyone. He encourages me to try out all the meetings and opportunites to explore what the Legion offers. Outpost 422 is a honors Practicum writing program I am designing as the GM of Broadcast for the Madison College Clarion to educate veterans about becoming bloggers. Blogging starts with fast-writing, which is why I am pursuing being an Adjutant when the opportunity presents itself. GNUTS Adjutant Club had me a little uneasy at first, but quickly warmed up when Commander Kotska said, “Smile! Take it easy! Nobody is going to rough you up.”

The Adjutant saying goes, “What goes on at the GNUTS club, stays at the GNUTS Club. If you wanna know more, become an Adjutant and pay the $5 to find out.”

The money we raised went to several agencies to assist veterans. GNUTS is a good time fundraising group and invite all who would like to become Adjutants to let you know it takes a lot of GNUTS to be one.

Closing Food for Thought:

Tomorrow will host two excellent speakers and am looking forward to sharing with you all the many more great things to come. God Bless the American Legion.

Sincerely,

Bradley J. Burt

American Legion Post 501 Madison, WI, Service Officer

The Department of Wisconsin American Legion Conference at the Marriot West in Middleton, WI

Outpost 422 State Street Veteran Checkpoint Report:

Good evening fellow veterans-

Today marked the first day of our Department of Wisconsin of the American Legion Convention. The first day of registration went well. There were several committee meetings today. I was unable to attend due to working the registration station. I did get to find some time to catch up with the Badger Legionnaire Communications and Marketing Specialist Marie Steffen. We chatted briefly about the upcoming General Manager Broadcast position I will be starting in the next two weeks and wanted to notify her I was a VA VITAL student attending the Madison College Clarion Practicum Journalism Program. Outpost 422 is the future program I have written to teach veterans how to write with an editorial voice. We will be exchanging emails moving forward regarding education and the Wisconsin G.I. Bill experience I am having at Madison College.

Registration:

https://valegion.org/2019-department-convention/

We hope to see all of you tomorrow at the convention. If you have not already registered I invite you to click on the link above for information regarding our weekend event. I am looking forward to hearing Major General Dunbar’s State of Wisconsin Adjutant speaking session. We are working to develop drone security on VA farms to keep out looters reported last fall to the Department of Agriculture, Consumer Protection, and Transportation. UW Madison and Madison College are developing opportunities for veterans who are using VA farms for PTSD therapy find their way through their struggled returning home. If you are struggling, please reach out to the Veterans Crisis Line by calling 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1.

Our state Department of Veterans Affairs hosts the Zero Veteran Suicide Initiative and encourage all who may be experiencing dark times seek the light. I am a Veterans Crisis Line survivor and a VA VITAL recovered disabled veteran who built this blog as an outreach. You can also download the PTSD Coach app that opens opportunities as well.

If you are struggling, check out Derek Weida. He helped me in tough times find the strength to call the Veterans Crisis Line. He is your battle buddy.

Volunteerism:

Volunteering to work at American Legion events gets me out in the community. Volunteering helps with meeting elder veterans who always make me laugh and cheer me up. Transferring to Post 501 of the American Legion in Madison, WI is by far enlightening. From our Brat Fests, to working registration at the Department Convention, I feel a sense of appreciation for the people who serve. I call the American Legion “the Veteran MEPS.” I had a chance to sit back and watch how we all treat one another and appreciate the efforts Legionnaires put forth to dedicate to the greater good of volunteerism. American Legion members accomplish the Zero Veteran Suicide Mission backed by our State Adjutant by being shining examples of ushers and stewards who truly care about all of those we lose at the rate of 22 per day.

Americanism and Solvency:

When it comes to dedicating and volunteering to the American Legion as a combat vet with wounds suffered in service; I treat my fellow members of my community with an ethical respect found in Americanism. I define Americanism as acting on my sacred oath I swore by doing my best to continue to live in a manner that promotes safety and security through how I speak and act. When I speak about how much I care about the auxiliary; I begin to see how crucial sustaining American liberty and freedom truly is the means to end community conflict as a veteran and a peacekeeper. Communities that war and bicker lead to violence and despair. Our job as Legionnaires is to strive to be civil with our neighbors. Our communities fall prey to harm due to a community divided by conflict. Americanism develops honesty. Solvency is the brand the American Legion sells. Solvency is about living according to a virtue of honesty through accuracy. Dedicating our volunteerism as a post openly with nothing to hide. Solvency builds trust in the community. I seek these virtues in all that I do.

Food for Thought:

As we Legionnaires move forward to seek new leaders and vote on resolutions; let us all reflect on solvency going into the polls. We must do what is right to sustain a healthy future as veterans for the American Legion to survive. May we always seek our elders to guide our ship to continue to do what we know is for the good of the American Legion. Thank you all for your efforts to perpetuate and maintain Americanism and Solvency. America is a better place for it.

Sincerely,

Bradley J. Burt

American Legion Post 501 Madison, WI Service Officer

The Privacy Act Statement of 1974—Know Your Rights in the Workplace When it Comes to VA Record Requests From Human Resources Managers

The Privacy Act Statement of 1974

(9) the term ‘‘recipient agency’’ means any agency, or contractor thereof, receiving records contained in a system of records from a source agency for use in a matching program;

(10) the term ‘‘non-Federal agency’’ means any State or local government, or agency thereof, which receives records contained in a system of records from a source agency for use in a matching program;

(13) (b) CONDITIONS OF DISCLOSURE.—No agency shall disclose any record which is contained in a system of records by any means of communication to any person, or to another agency, except pursuant to a written request by, or with the prior written consent of, the individual to whom the record pertains, unless disclosure of the record would be— (1) to those officers and employees of the agency which maintains the record who have a need for the record in the performance of their duties;

(d) ACCESS TO RECORDS.—Each agency that maintains a system of records shall— (1) upon request by any individual to gain access to his record or to any information pertaining to him which is contained in the system, permit him and upon his request, a person of his own choosing to accompany him, to review the record and have a copy made of all or any portion thereof in a form comprehensible to him, except that the agency may require the individual to furnish a written statement authorizing discussion of that individual’s record in the accompanying person’s presence; (2) permit the individual to request amendment of a record pertaining to him and— (A) not later than 10 days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal public holidays) after the date of receipt of such request, acknowledge in writing such receipt; and (B) promptly, either— (i) make any correction of any portion thereof which the individual believes is not accurate, relevant, timely, or complete; or (ii) inform the individual of its refusal to amend the record in accordance with his request, the reason for the refusal, the procedures established by the agency for the individual to request a review of that refusal by the head of the agency or an officer designated by the head of the agency, and the name and business address of that official;

(i)(1) CRIMINAL PENALTIES.—Any officer or employee of an agency, who by virtue of his employment or official position, has possession of, or access to, agency records which contain individually identifiable information the disclosure of which is prohibited by this section or by rules or regulations established thereunder, and who knowing that disclosure of the specific material is so prohibited, willfully discloses the material in any manner to any person or agency not entitled to receive it, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and fined not more than $5,000. (2) Any officer or employee of any agency who willfully maintains a system of records without meeting the notice requirements of subsection (e)(4) of this section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and fined not more than $5,000. (3) Any person who knowingly and willfully requests or obtains any record concerning an individual from an agency under false pretenses shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and fined not more than $5,000.

Official Document:

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/USCODE-2012-title5/pdf/USCODE-2012-title5-partI-chap5-subchapII-sec552a.pdf

Food for Thought:

Veterans do not need to produce records in fear of last chance agreements. You are now armed with the knowledge to defend yourself. My goal as a UW Whitewater Political Science-legal emphasis major is to protect disabled veterans from predatory practices by attorneys and human resources last chance agreements. They are against the law and am taking a stance to put a stop to it through undercover private investigations.

We Cannot Afford Anymore VA Setbacks—All Veterans Deserve Mental Health Treatment Regardless of Discharge

The Crisis

Today is the day we all put our foot down with the VA. We must advocate that all veterans regardless of discharge receive mental health treatment whenever they reach out to the Veterans Crisis Line. Vietnam Vets served two tours and went home. Our combat veteran demographic shift all changed when President Bush declared stop-loss for those who fight the War on Terror. Our society is failing to accept that combat leads to chemical dependence that develops into other-than-honorable discharges. Vietnam vets should always be the first in line to receive treatment regardless of discharge. We are getting them the help they need one vet at a time. They are priority in my book. I lived with untreated conditions for twenty years and speak from a platform of first-hand experience with the VA.

The Dilemma

Our recent 22 per day epidemic stems from an over exacerbation of combat exposure that sends our troops 18 tours to combat in a non-special operator Military Occupation Skill! How long will it take for America to wake up and realize freedom is not a luxury? What will it take for you stop harassing veterans who use the VA and why do you feel the citizens have the right to marginalize veterans? You don’t! You do not know what the third world looks like until you get there. Stop judging. As a disabled veteran who was harassed to the point of needing to use the Veterans Crisis Line at work from journey workers who threatened violence I can say that I speak as an advocate who has graduated through the college VA VITAL program and will use my academics to write Op-eds to end this nonsense.

The American Legion Post 501 of Madison, WI—the History of the Wisconsin G.I. Bill According to Airman Mautz

Madison, WI Post 501 of the American Legion February Meeting

By Bradley J. Burt 

4 February 2019– At 1900 hours, the Post 501 Meeting was called to order by Commander Tom Stolarczyk.

Call to Order:

Prior to the start of the meeting, I met with previous State Commander ’75-’76 Bud A. Mautz. I am a student at Madison College, along with being a Post 501 member who is pursuing a Journalism Certificate and am a UW Liberal Arts Transfer Student.  My passion is to write blogs for therapy and am using the Wisconsin G.I. Bill to supplement my income while I return to school. I am grateful for the efforts of our past state commander and am paying blog journalism forward to spread the great news you are never too old to return to school.

My mission as an intern is to investigate through interviews to discover veterans who are the difference makers in Wisconsin. Bud Mautz and his work with the Wisconsin G.I. Bill, its history, along with reporting to the post as a member cultivates my ability to write and motivates my sense of duty to stay the course as a college student. I transferred to Post 501 in November of 2018.  I met a fine gentleman by the name of Bud my first time visiting Post 501. Once I finished filling out my transfer, Bud revealed to me his past accomplishment during the Senator Doyle era, who shared the story of the Wisconsin G.I. Bill. As a benefactor of his efforts I was immediately enlightened by a divine calling. The Wisconsin G.I. Bill allows our State to fund veterans with 100% college tuition who return to school once they exhaust their federal G.I. Bill.  Bud is a true American Legion hero.  His work is saving my life in a time of uncertainty.  This is his version of the story.

The History of the Wisconsin G.I. Bill assembled a committee, who extended an invitation to Post 501 of the American Legion, to meet to discuss tuition grants for veterans. Air Force Korea Era Veteran Bud A. Mautz was nominated who graciously accepted the invitation. A committee through the State of Wisconsin was assembled where Airman Mautz advocated as past State Commander in favor of stimulating veteran education, who has a background as a member of the MATC Alumni of the auto mechanic industry, who completed his Edsel automotive apprenticeship.  Bud was one of the first auto apprenticeship students at Madison College. 

The negotiating of the Wisconsin G.I. Bill was through UW Madison Alumni Council, which happened during the Governor Doyle era. Mautz made clear during our interview “two female UW Board Scholars protested helping veterans on the grounds that the military was all men.” Bud announced to the panel that the military at the time was 18% women, who would also benefit. Mautz indicated he acted on what he thought was right at the time. He wanted to see all who enter service in Wisconsin reap the benefit of free tuition.

Food for Thought:

When our elders advocate for education our future generations become the benefactors of strong veteran minds who share their experience and attention to detail in the workplace. Strong leaders build strong Legionnaires. Sometimes our efforts as veterans to advocate for benefits are unclear to those who invest in the future of veterans. Airman Mautz dedicated his knowledge and expertise to the preservation of academia through staying the course during the argument by standing up to the UW Board women who sought to turn down Mautz’s efforts to lead the charge. I can’t imagine where I would be right now had he given up the fight.

Madison College UW Madison Liberal Arts Transfer Program is available to veterans to explore options through the VA VITAL program after seeking treatment at Building 22 at the Madison VA Hospital. Outpost 422 is here to help you with your transition.

The Rewards of American Legion Membership:

We as Legionnaires win the argument when we perpetuate Americanism demonstrated by Past Department Commander Bud A. Mautz.  I certainly hope to follow in his footsteps as I march forward to advocate for disabled veterans in Washington D.C. when I finish my Political Science-Journalism degree.

I had a great meeting at Post 501 that night. Education keeps veterans like me in the fight and can pick you up too. American Legion Post 501 of Madison, WI is a hard working post who hosts great leaders who are willing to help you find your way through transition. We never leave our wounded behind. We invite you to join our mission and hope you will come to our club to meet the great advocates like Mautz who are the gears that turn the engine of our post. We have many great stories and a beautiful facility with an open door and a handshake to welcome you home. We are your American Legion. If you are newly transitioning or visiting the Madison, WI area, do not hesitate to reach out anytime. We are here to serve you.

Website Point of Contact: http://www.madisonlegionpost501.org/

The Wisconsin State Capitol POW MIA Flag is in Need of Replacing

The care for our POW MIA flag at the Wisconsin State Capitol Should Be Our First Priority

The condition of the POW MIA flag at the Wisconsin State Capitol is an omen of how far behind our Capitol has fallen with proper flag procedures. Veterans spend countless hours caring for flags and preparing for ceremonies as rifle teams. The Capitol is our representation to the nation of our token of appreciation for those who entered into service from Wisconsin. With the recent undermining by our Governor with flying three flags on one staff that breaks proper flag protocol, it makes me wonder where Tony Evers stands as an American. When our leaders neglect to properly care for our flags, the first question should be, “What kind of leader lets our flags fly to the point of becoming tattered?”

https://classroom.synonym.com/proper-display-of-american-flag-with-a-pow-flag-state-flag-12079728.html

The Dilemma:

Displaying the American Flag

According to author Ben Webb of “classroom.synonym.com (2017)” wrote:

“To properly display the American flag, the POW/MIA flag, and a state flag together, certain precautions must be taken. First and foremost, the American flag must always have precedence. The flag should always be to its own right (or the viewer’s left) of other flags or in front of them, and never behind, below, or to its own left (the viewer’s right) of any other flags (except at church services given by naval chaplains at sea). The flag should also be illuminated if it is to be hung for 24 hours a day, otherwise, it should be run up the staff at sunrise, and lowered ceremoniously at sunset. The American flag should also be displayed in, on, or near every public institution, every polling place during elections, and every schoolhouse in America. When hanging the American flag indoors, or displaying it from a window, the Union (blue star field) should always be to the viewer’s left. If placed over a street, the Union should be on the north side of the flag (if the street runs east and west) or the east side (if the street runs north and south). Similarly, if the flag is draped in a building (hung straight down from its edge), the union should be to the north or east (depending upon the building location).”

Wisconsin is failing to meet the need to care for its Capitol flags.

The Impact: Ignoring proper flag protocol lends to the appearance we as a state are under duress. Our Governor can blast procedures he makes up on the fly with the recent pride flag stunt he pulled without consulting veteran organizations first. Why are we allowing progressives to undermine what we veterans have worked so hard to establish with drill and ceremony, respect to our elders who have been captured who have not returned home, and how are we evolving as veterans in our state?

The Solution: Take a moment to reflect on Governor Evers and his ignorance as a leader. We cannot possibly afford to continue down the path of allowing our POW MIA flag at the Capitol to look like a Revolutionary War relic. We start by contacting individuals like Al Labelle at Department of Veterans Affairs who have direct contacts with our Governor. Call our State Adjutant as well. The military leaders have jurisdiction over flag flying at the Capitol. They need to be put in check when veterans are not allowed on the roof to replace old flags our Governor neglects.

Al Labelle’s contact info:

Al Labelle

Wisconsin Benefits Protection Team Leader
715-207-8870

Our State Adjutant Contact Info:

https://dma.wi.gov/DMA/dunbar